This is the "Author Rights" page of the "Copyright Information for ResU Personnel" guide.
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Copyright Information for ResU Personnel  

Please note that the majority of information regarding copyright laws came from the University of Florida Libraries at http://guides.uflib.ufl.edu/copyright. Some information has been retracted and added to cater to the needs of the ResU Community.
Last Updated: Jan 6, 2017 URL: http://libguides.resu.edu/copyright Print Guide RSS UpdatesEmail Alerts

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An Explanation of Manuscript Versions

Publishers often make distinctions between three primary versions of a manuscript: the pre-print, the post-print and the publishers version.

Pre-print – A pre-print is the original version of the manuscript as it is submitted to a journal. While the authors may have sought help from their colleagues in selecting data analysis techniques, improving manuscript clarity, and correcting grammar, the pre-print has not been through a process of peer review. It typically looks like a term paper – a double spaced .doc file with minimal formatting.

Post-print – A post-print is a document that has been through the peer review process and incorporated reviewers comments. It is the final version of the paper before it is sent off the the journal for publication. It may be missing a final copyedit (if the journal still does that) and won’t be formatted to look like the journal. It still looks like the double spaced .doc file. Sometimes, the term “pre-print” is used interchangeably with “post-print,” but when it comes to permissions issues, it is important to clarify which version of a manuscript is being discussed.

Publishers version/PDF – This is the version of record that is published on the publishers website. It will look quite spiffy, having been professionally typeset by the publisher. Library databases will link to this version of the paper.

Generally speaking, publishers are more likely to be okay with authors posting copies of pre-print versus other manuscript versions. But each journal is different, and authors need to be aware of what they can do. The copyright transfer agreement is the best place to find this information.

From: http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/information-culture/2013/12/16/understanding-your-rights-pre-prints-post-prints-and-publisher-versions/

 

What Rights Do You Have in Your Work?

This brief video from the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC) explains what rights you can retain as an author.

 

 

Using SHERPA/RoMEO

SHERPA/RoMEO collects information about the permissions related to online sharing (“archiving”) of your article for most publishers and journals. Journals and publishers are classified according to a color scheme, and additional restrictions are listed.

Authors who wish to publish a copy of their articles will want to look for journals classified as green or blue, then check on any additional restrictions.

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